Torus Buckle Fracture Treatment

Torus Buckle Fracture Treatment

A buckle fracture, also called a torus fracture, is an extremely common injury seen in children. Because children have softer, more flexible bones, one side of the bone may buckle upon itself without disrupting the other side of the bone—also known as an incomplete fracture.
Stable fractures such as a buckle or torus fracture can generally be treated in a splint or cast for 3 to 4 weeks. If the bones are angled, the doctor may need to reset the bones to get a better alignment and then put a cast on to hold the bones in place while they heal.
This study suggests that subacute treatment doesn't adversely affect outcomes. Buckle (or torus) fractures—the most common type of fracture occurring in the .
Your child will have an x-ray of his or her arm to see if the arm is broken. If the x-ray shows a distal radius buckle (torus) fracture, then your child will get a Velcro .
Buckle (torus) fractures occur when the bony cortex is compressed and bulges,. currently treat buckle fractures of the distal radius with a removable splint.
A buckle or torus fracture is a type of broken bone. One side of the bone bends, raising a little buckle, without breaking the other side of the bone.

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